Tag Archives: USA

Franz Liszt: the calm before the storm

I was looking for an old recording of mine, and found this video from June 1, 2012. Since 2005, I have been on the jury of the San Jose International Piano Competition every June. The competition always opens with a gala concert from members of the jury. Among the selections I performed on this occasion are movements from the “Annes de Pèlerinage” (Years of Pilgrimage) by Franz Liszt. Two of these pieces are so incredibly contrasting, and placed right one after the other in the middle of the 9-movement suite. They are both about water, but the first is called “Au bord d’une source” (Beside a spring), and the second is titled “Orage” (Storm). The former is so wonderfully peaceful, lively yet infusing an inner calmness, brightly shimmering, glittering, the drone of spring water inducing the most pleasant of feelings; the latter is such an outburst of nature’s violent and fearsome might. Both beautiful in their own way, I think. The audio quality is not first rate, what with all the compressions. Nonetheless, I hope they’ll be enjoyable to whomever wants to listen!

 

 

Foto Santo Domingo

Sergei Rachmaninoff Piano Concerto N.4

The Fourth Piano Concerto by Sergei Rachmaninoff is an extraordinary composition, and perhaps the least appreciated of the Rachmaninoff Concertos. I feel it is a dark piece, and for me it should not be played too “brilliantly”. The development of the first movement, and most of the last, in my opinion, cannot be fully appreciated when the piece is played at breakneck speed.

The most important traits of this piece are the heart-wrenching sadness, nostalgia, and melancholy. Even the “Dies irae” theme, so recurring in Rachmaninoff, is heard here at the end of the first movement, in the piano left hand, in such a melancholy way.

Compositionally, it is by far the most complex of Rachmaninoff’s works, with hundreds of passages where the piano and the orchestra play in cross rhythms, irregular groups, syncopations. The composer makes this sound purposely “out of sync” most of the time, which gives the piece a feeling of great instability. The climaxes, those gorgeous explosions of passionate lyricism, are also present here as in other more popular Rachmaninoff works, but for once they are not the most significant traits, although they greatly enrich the whole. The harmonic language is far more daring than that of all the other Rachmaninoff Concertos, more modern, if you will. In that respect, maybe this is the only truly modern piece Rachmaninoff wrote for the piano. Yet the work still offers a romantic allure, creating a combination of old and new that holds an immense fascination for me.

This is a very difficult work to perform, I find, requiring a heightened state of concentration on the part of everyone involved, at all times. I didn’t notice it as we were performing it, but in the recording I can actually hear some of the musicians counting! I promise you it wasn’t me, although I was doing it in my head.

It was exciting to play this work with Maestro Theodore Kuchar. I find him to be an amazing musician, deeply committed to his Art, very humble although his level of artistry is up there with the best of them, and an incredibly gifted accompanist, too.

As always, it was a privilege to perform with the musicians of the Cape Town Philharmonic, truly a fantastic ensemble.

 

 

Foto Santo Domingo